Curriculum & Teaching 440: Teaching English in the Middle/ Secondary School

Fall 2009

Class number: 27003

143 JRP

MW 11:00-12:15

Instructor: Heidi L. Hallman, Ph.D.             

Email: hhallman@ku.edu

Office: 338 JRP

Office phone: (785) 864-9670                                                                      

Office hours: By appointment during the Fall 2009 semester

                                                                                                             

 

Purpose of course:

This is an English/ Language Arts methods course that focuses on understanding middle and secondary students as literacy learners. In this course we will:

-      Become familiar with the major concepts and approaches of English/ Language Arts and literacy education, focusing on the written and oral language development of students from grades 6-12.

-      Focus our inquiry on reading and writing assessment of individual students, matching instruction to assessment information, and modifying curriculum based on individual needs.

-      Practice various forms of reading and writing assessments and develop instructional plans based on these assessments.

-      Investigate definitions of literacy, how young adults become literate, as well as how and why young adults use literacy.

-      Critically examine research, theories, and practices in English Education and explore the social, cultural, and political implications of literacy education.

-      Incorporate multicultural education principles of social justice and equity into the English/ Language Arts curriculum in order to create lessons with high expectations for all students. These lessons honor students' lifeworlds and personal literacies, and also support their achievement.

-      Begin to develop philosophies of literacy education that take into account the needs of all learners.

-      Utilize and understand standards-based approaches to lesson planning.

 

 

The purpose of the course also connects with the mission of KU's School of Education:

Within the University, the School of Education serves Kansas, the nation, and the world by (1) preparing individuals to be leaders and practitioners in education and related human service fields, (2) expanding and deepening understanding of education as a fundamental human endeavor, and (3) helping society define and respond to its educational responsibilities and challenges.

The components that frame this mission for our initial and advanced programs are Research and Best Practice, Content Knowledge, and Professionalism. These interlocking themes build our Conceptual Framework.

 

 

 

 Standards Addressed in C & T 440:

 

This course helps meet the following standard for national accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE):

Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions: Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other professional school personnel know and demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

This course helps meet the following standards in professional education for state accreditation by the Kansas State Department of Education:

Standard #1 The educator demonstrates the ability to use the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of each discipline he or she teaches and can create opportunities that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for all students.

Standard #4. The educator understands and uses a variety of appropriate instructional strategies to develop various kinds of students' learning including critical thinking, problem solving, and reading.

Standard #7 The educator plans effective instruction based upon the knowledge of all students, community, subject matter, curriculum outcomes, and current methods of teaching reading.

Standard #8. The educator understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continual intellectual, social, and other aspects of personal development of all learners.

Standard #9 The educator is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his or her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community), actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally, and participates in the school improvement process (Kansas Quality Performance Accreditation [QPA]).

This course helps meet the following standards and indicators specific to English/Language Arts Late childhood through early adolescence (grades 5-8) for state accreditation by the Kansas State Department of Education.

Standard #1 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of current methods for teaching processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, thinking, and viewing and their interrelationships.

Standard #2 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of a variety of print and non-print texts and of how learners create and discover meaning in a text.

Standard #3 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of the history, structure, and development of the English language and how people use language to influence the thinking and actions of others.

Standard #4 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates the ability to communicate effectively and responsibly for a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

This course helps meet the following standards and indicators specific to English/Language Arts early adolescence through late adolescence (grades 6-12) for state accreditation by the Kansas State Department of Education.

Standard #1 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of a variety of texts, both print and non-print, and of how learners create and discover meaning in a text.

Standard #2 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of the history, structure, and development of the English language and how people use language to influence the thinking and actions of others.

 

Standard #3 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates the ability to communicate effectively and responsibly for a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Standard #4 The teacher of English language arts demonstrates knowledge of current methods for teaching processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, thinking, and viewing and their interconnections.

 

Required Texts:

 

Anderson, M.T. (2004). Feed. Candlewick Press.

Isbn-10: 0763622591

Isbn-13: 9780763622596

 

Burke, J. (2007). The English Teacher's Companion, 3rd edition. Heinemann.

 

Christensen, L. (2000). Reading, writing, and rising up: Teaching about social justice and the power of the written word. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools. ISBN 0-942961-25-0

 

Moore, D., Alvermann, D. & Hinchman, K. (Eds). (2000). Struggling adolescent readers: A collection of teaching strategies. International Reading Association.     ISBN 0-87207-272-X

*In syllabus this text is referred to as "SAR"

 

Ryan, Pam Munoz. (2000). Esperanza Rising. Scholastic. ISBN 043912042X

 

Smagorinsky, P. (2008). Teaching English by Design: How to create and carry out instructional units. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

 

Tovani, C. (2000). I read it, but I don't get it. Portland, ME: Stenhouse. ISBN 1-57110-089-X

 

Required Articles (found on Blackboard):

 

Gee, J. P. (2001). Literacy, Discourse, and Linguistics: Introduction and What is Literacy? In Cushman, E., et al. (Eds.) Literacy: A Critical Sourcebook (pp. 525-544). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's.

 

Brandt, D. (1998). Sponsors of literacy. College Composition and Communication, 49(2), pp. 165-185

 

Alsup, J., Conard-Salvo, T. & Peters, S. (2008). Tutoring is Real: The benefits of the peer tutor experience for future English Educators. Pedagogy: Critical approaches to teaching literature, language, composition, and culture, 8 (2), 237-347.

 

McLaughlin, M. and DeVoogd, G. (2004). Critical literacy as comprehension: Expanding reader response. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 48 (1), 52-82.

 

Santoli, S. and Wagner, M. (2004). Promoting Young Adult Literature: The other "real" literature. American Secondary Education, 33 (1), 65-75.

 

Gallo, D. (2001). How classics create an alliterate society. English Journal, 90 (3), 33-39.

 

Hairston, M. (1982). The Winds of Change: Thomas Kuhn and the revolution of the teaching of writing. College Composition and Communication, 33 (1), 76-88.

 

Sommers, N. (1980). Revision strategies of student writers and experienced adult writers. College Composition and Communication.

 

Weaver, C. (1996). Teaching Grammar in the Context of Writing. English Journal, 85(7), 15-24.

 

Noden, H. (2001). Image Grammar: Painting Images with Grammatical Structures. Voices from the Middle, 8 (3), 7-16.

 

Black, R.W. (2005). Access and Affiliation: The literacy and composition practices of English-language learners in an online fanfiction community. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 49(2), 118-128.

 

Hallman, H.L. (2007). Negotiating Teacher Identity: Exploring the use of electronic teaching portfolios with preservice English teachers. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 50(6), 474-485.

 

Recommended Texts:

 

Atwell, N. (1998). In the middle: New understandings about writing, reading, and Learning (2nd edition). Heinemann. ISBN 0-86709-374-9

 

 

Course Requirements

 

1. Literacy History—5 points

Due September 9th

See handout for instructions.

 

2. Discussant (one half hour)—10 points

With one of your peers, lead the day's discussion in which you share your understandings of the week's required readings related to the session's topic. You will present for 15-20 minutes. For the remainder of the discussion, you will lead the class in a discussion and/ or learning activities that will deepen our ways of thinking about teaching the English/ Language Arts.

 

3. Tovani reading strategy presentation (15-20 minutes)—10 points

In groups of 2-3, demonstrate how to conduct a comprehension reading strategy with a small, large, or whole group.

Create materials to teach the lesson and develop a written lesson plan (use lesson plan guidelines if you need them) with handouts for the rest of your colleagues in our class.

 

4. Tutoring journal—20 total points

Due: October 14, November 23, and December 9th

You will have a unique tutoring component to C & T 440 that will give you experience working with middle/ high school literacy learners.

A tutoring experience (also the service-learning component of the course) will match you with a learner in the community who desires tutoring in the area of writing. You will work with this learner on his/ her writing over the course of the semester for at least 15 hours. You will document your experience in a journal throughout the semester, using the prompts given to you in class as a way to reflect on this experience.

 

In small groups in class on particular class days (Oct. 14, Nov. 23, and Dec. 9) you will discuss students' literacy learning in your tutoring site.

 

On Monday, November 23rd, Dr. Hallman and Melanie Burdick will conduct focus group interviews with you about your experience tutoring this semester.

 

5. Literature Circles and Two Teaching sessions—10 points literature circle participation (5 points per lit. circle)/ 20 points teaching sessions (10 points for each lesson plan)

We will read two young adult novels in the course and you will prepare to participate in a literature circle to discuss each of the novels. Literature circles will meet twice during the semester, and you should bring your books to each meeting.

For the teaching sessions, you will be asked to compose a lesson plan, clearly stating objectives for the lesson as well as procedures and assessments.

 

6. Thematic unit and presentation—25 points (Presentation is your final exam for the course)

Students will prepare a 2-4 week thematic unit. The unit should actively involve students in meaningful learning; carefully individualize to accommodate the diverse strengths and weaknesses of students; effectively integrate reading, writing, oral language, and language study; and provide for authentic assessment. The unit should revolve around a particular theme and be prepared for a diverse student population. The unit should include but is not limited to the following:

 

-      Narrative Overview of the Unit

-      Unit Rationale

-      Background Information about the Students

-      Background Information about the School

-      Objectives (Two of the objectives should be from the KS standards.)

-      Materials

-      Sampling of Activities (at least 5) for the 2-4 weeks

-      Complete lesson plans for two days of the unit

 

7. Participation and Attendance—10 points

Come to class each week on time. (If an emergency arises and you will be late or absent, call or email me before class.) Each unexcused absence (beyond one) will result in a 2 pt. deduction from your grade. Tardiness will also affect your participation grade with three tardies equaling one absence.

 

Come prepared each week with completed assignments. Be ready to discuss the readings, to actively participate in a variety of activities, and to collaborate with your colleagues in offering feedback based on critical reflection of assignments, drafts of projects, and teaching practice.

 

TOTAL OF 110 POSSIBLE POINTS

_______________________________________________________________________

 

Grading Scale

A= 93-100%

AB= 88-92%

B= 83-87%

BC= 78-82%

C= 70-77%

D= 60-69%

F= 59% or below

 

Policy on Instructional Modification for the School of Education:

Students who have a disability, exceptionalities or condition which may impair abilities to complete assignments or otherwise satisfy course criteria are encouraged to meet with the course instructor to identify, discuss, and document any viable instructional modification or accommodations. The student should notify the instructor no later than the end of the second week of the semester term in which the course is offered or no later that the end of the second week after such a disability is diagnosed, whichever occurs earliest. Please contact Services for Students with Disabilities, Rm.22, Strong Hall, 864-2620.

Academic Misconduct:

Academic misconduct is taken very seriously at the University of Kansas. The following is a quotation from section 2.6.1 of the University Senate Rules and Regulations:

 

Academic misconduct by a student shall include, but not be limited to, disruption of classes, giving or receiving unauthorized aid on examinations or in the preparation of notebooks, themes, reports or other assignments, knowingly misrepresenting the source of any academic work, falsification of research results, plagiarizing of another's work, violation of regulation or ethical codes for the treatment of human or animal subjects, or otherwise acting dishonestly in research.

_______________________________________________________________________

 

Professional Websites:

There are many professional websites that will help you get ideas, develop unit, lesson, and activity plans, etc. Listed below are some of the professional websites you may find helpful during this course. With just a little searching, you will be able to find many more.

 

National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)  www.ncte.org

Kansas Association of Teachers of English (KATE)           http://web.jccc.net/kate

International Reading Association (IRA) www.reading.org

National Middle School Association www.nmsa.org

National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grade Reforms www.mgforum.org

Schools to Watch www.schoolstowatch.org

National High School Association www.nhsa.net

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards www.nbpts.org

Kansas Dept. of Education www.ksde.org

Professional Education Standards www.ksde.org/cert/CertHandbook.doc

Subject Standards for Students www.ksde.org/standards.htm

(then look for your grade level(s) and subject area)

            Kansas Performance Assessment (KPA) www.ksde.org/cert/kpa.html www.ksde.org/cert/KPA%20Handbook.doc

 

Professional Associations, Conferences, and Publications:

 

It is a good idea to become involved or at least to join one or more professional associations. They offer publications, conferences, online forums and materials, opportunities for publishing and much, much more. Additionally, as a student you are in a wonderful position because many of these organizations have very low student membership rates and once you are a member you may subscribe to the organization's publications.

 

The NCTE conference is in Philadelphia this year from November 19-22. The KATE conference is in Wichita on Oct. 22 & 23. It would be worth your time to check into attending the KATE conference (a great way to start making contacts). English Journal is the major publication for English teachers published by NCTE—an excellent subscription choice.

 

Schedule

 

Introductions and "What is literacy?"

Monday, 8/24

Introductions

Preview texts/ discuss syllabus/ Discussion for today: "What is literacy?"

 

Wednesday, 8/26

Gee, J. P. (2001). Literacy, Discourse, and Linguistics: Introduction and What is Literacy? In Cushman, E., et al. (Eds.) Literacy: A Critical Sourcebook (pp. 525-544). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's.

 

Brandt, D. (1998). Sponsors of literacy. College Composition and Communication, 49(2), pp. 165-185

 

Introduce Literacy History assignment

 

Monday, 8/31 Intro to this semester's tutoring experience

 

Alsup, J., Conard-Salvo, T. & Peters, S. (2008). Tutoring is Real: The benefits of the peer tutor experience for future English Educators. Pedagogy: Critical approaches to teaching literature, language, composition, and culture, 8 (2), 237-347.

 

11:00-11:30 Visit by Laura Leonard, director of Central Jr. High's after school program

 

11:30-noon The teaching and tutoring of writing: An overview presented by Kayleen Fleming and Lauren Bricklemyer to help prepare you for your tutoring experience this semester

 

Discussion of tutoring activity for Wednesday

 

Wednesday, 9/ 2       

Tutoring activity in partners (using a draft of partner's writing)

 

Discussion of tutoring activity/ questions about tutoring

 

Sign up for tutoring experiences

 

Monday, 9/7

Labor Day—No class

 

Wednesday, 9/9

Discuss feedback from tutoring activity/ confirm sign up for tutoring placements

Literacy History due (share)

Tovani: Part I (pp. 1-21)

 

 

Teaching Reading in the Middle/ Secondary English Classroom

 

Monday, 9/14

Burke: pp. 32-58

Smagorinsky: Chapter 1         

 

Wednesday, 9/16

Tovani Chapter 3 Presentation

SAR: 66-73

SAR: 128-135

Discussants:_________________ _______________________

 

Monday, 9/21

SAR: 19-26

Smagorinsky: Chapters 2-4

Discussants: _________________ _______________________

 

Wednesday, 9/23

Tovani Chapter 4 Presentation

SAR: 122-127

226-237

Discussants:_________________ ________________________

 

McLaughlin, M. and DeVoogd, G. (2004). Critical literacy as comprehension: Expanding reader response. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 48 (1), pp. 52-82.

 

Monday, 9/28

Burke: pp. 58-75

Discussants: __________________ ________________________

Begin reading Esperanza Rising

Discuss prompts for tutoring journal due 10/14

 

Wednesday, 9/30

Tovani Chapter 5 Presentation

Literature Circle #1: Esperanza Rising

 

Monday, 10/5

Santoli, S. and Wagner, M. (2004). Promoting young adult literature: The other "real" literature. American Secondary Education, 33 (1), pp. 65-75.

Gallo, D. (2001). How classics create an alliterate society. English Journal, 90 (3), pp. 33-39.

Discussants:__________________ ________________________

Begin reading Feed

 

Wednesday, 10/7

Literature Circle #2: Feed

 

 

 

Lesson and Unit Planning

 

Monday, 10/12

Burke: pp. 238-248

pp. 266-283

Discussants:_________________ ____________________

Smagorinsky: Chapters 8 and 9

 

 

Wednesday, 10/14

Tovani Chapter 8 Presentation

Share journals (TUTORING JOURNALS DUE TODAY)

Preparation for teaching sessions next week

 

Monday, 10/19

 

Teaching session #1 (Lesson plan due)

 

Wednesday, 10/21

 

Teaching session #1 (Lesson plan due)

 

Teaching Writing in the Middle/ Secondary English Classroom

 

Monday, 10/26: Intro to the teaching of writing

Burke: 151-174          

Hairston, M. (1982). The Winds of Change: Thomas Kuhn and the revolution of the teaching of writing. College Composition and Communication, 33 (1), 76-88.

 

Wednesday, 10/28: Creating writing assignments          

Smagorinsky, Chapter 5 and 6

Discussants: _________________ __________________

 

Monday, 11/2: Teaching grammar within the context of teaching writing

Noden, H. (2001). Image Grammar: Painting Images with Grammatical Structures. Voices from the Middle, 8 (3), pp. 7-16.

Sommers, N. (1980). Revision strategies of student writers and experienced adult writers. College Composition and Communication.

Weaver, C. (1996). Teaching Grammar in the Context of Writing. English Journal, 85(7), pp. 15-24.

           

Wednesday, 11/4: Responding to and assessing students' writing

Smagorinsky: Chapter 7

Burke: pp. 210-219

Discussants: _________________ __________________

Assessment

 

Monday, 11/9

Burke: pp. 284-306

Discussants:___________________ _______________________

Teaching session #2 (Lesson plan due)

 

Wednesday, 11/11

Teaching session #2 (Lesson plan due)

 

Monday, 11/16

Burke: pp. 306-318

Discussants:___________________ _______________________

 

Wednesday, 11/18

Discuss Thematic Unit (Final project for course)/ small groups discuss ideas for unit

Preparation for focus group interviews on 11/23

 

Monday, 11/23

Discussion of Writing Tutoring experience/ Focus group interviews

Dr. Hallman and Melanie will interview focus groups about their experience with the tutoring component of the course.

 

Focus group interview #1: 11:00-11:30 (2 groups)

Focus group interview #2: 11:45-12:15 (2 groups)

 

(TUTORING JOURNALS DUE TODAY)

 

Wednesday, 11/25

No Class—Thanksgiving Break

 

New Directions in the Teaching of English

Monday, 11/30

Burke: pp. 400-408                

 

Black, R.W. (2005). Access and Affiliation: The literacy and composition practices of English-language learners in an online fanfiction community. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 49(2), pp. 118-128.

Discussants: _______________ __________________                                           

 

Wednesday, 12/2

Advising day (discuss English Ed program in 5th year and beyond)

 

 

 

 

Professional development as a beginning English teacher

 

Monday, 12/7

Burke: pp. 440-449

 pp. 450-473

 

Discussants: _______________ ______________________

 

Hallman, H.L. (2007). Negotiating Teacher Identity: Exploring the use of electronic teaching portfolios with preservice English teachers. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 50(6), pp. 474-485.

 

Wednesday, 12/9—Last class day

Share journals (TUTORING JOURNALS DUE TODAY)

Thematic Unit Presentations

 

 

Day of scheduled final exam:

Thematic Unit Presentations