HSES 289

Introduction to Sport Management

 

Professor: Dr. Angela Lumpkin

Office: 146B Robinson

Telephone: 864-0778

E-mail: alumpkin@ku.edu

Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:30-10:45 am; Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 pm; also by appointment

 

Course Objectives

1.     Students, through an exploration of the fundamental content areas within sport management, will make a reasoned, knowledgeable choice about whether sport management is an appropriate career path.

2.     Students will identify careers of interest to them, investigate the chosen career, and demonstrate through written assignments their knowledge about and understanding of how to advance in the chosen career.

3.     Students will be able to explain the principles of leadership and management as applied in sport settings.

4.     Students will be able to describe, analyze, and apply the principles and issues in sport ethics, personnel management, financial management, sport law, facility and event management, strategic planning, and sport marketing.

 

Required Readings

There is no required textbook for this course. Students are responsible for all reading assignments. Each reading is available through the URL links provided on the course syllabus or via Blackboard. Be sure and click on the latter portion of the link on the course syllabus to access each article. Or, you may have to cut and paste the URL into your browser to access each article. You can also access each journal article by typing in the journal title using e-journals on the library web site and finding the specific issue using a database.

 

Course Requirements

1.     Punctuality and class attendance are required in this course. Please be respectful by being on time for each class. If you are sick, it is your responsibility to tell the professor; no doctor's notes are required. For every unexcused absence over two classes, your final grade will be lowered one portion of a letter grade (i.e., A- to B+ or B+ to B). If you miss six or more classes, you will receive an F in this course.

2.     Reading assignments — Each assigned reading should be completed prior to the class in which it will be discussed to enable you to participate in discussions about the content of each reading. To encourage you to be prepared for class discussions, you are expected to complete an online quiz (via Blackboard) for each topical area. You can earn up to 5 bonus points on each quiz by completing each quiz by the dates listed below as well as on the course outline. These quizzes will disappear from Blackboard at 11 am on these dates, so you will no longer be able to access these quizzes. Should you get locked out of a quiz prior to this deadline, please send me an email message so you can be provided access to the quiz.

 

Topical Areas

Deadlines for the Online Quizzes

Leadership

11 am on January 26

Management

11 am on January 28 February 2

Sport ethics

11 am on February 9 11

Personnel management

11 am on February 18

Financial management and economics

11 am on March 11

Sport law and risk management

11 am on April 6

Facility and event planning and management

11 am on April 8

Sport marketing

11 am on May 6

 

3.     Written assignments — Four papers (for a total of 200 points) To assist in locating articles for these assignments Lea Currie in the University Libraries has developed a library guide for this course at http://guides.lib.ku.edu/HSES289. Below are the task descriptions and grading rubrics for each.

 

-      Written assignment #1 (20 points) (Due on February 16)

Task Description: Each student will identify a specific career aspiration within sport management, conduct an interview of a professional in the selected career (this person cannot be a student or an intern), and write a two-to three-page report of this interview.

 

Exemplary Performance

Proficient Performance

Marginal Performance

Description of the Career and Responsibilities of the Person Interviewed (4 points)

The paper clearly and explicitly describes the position and responsibilities of the person interviewed.

The paper provides a general description of the responsibilities of the person interviewed.

The paper provides only a brief overview of the responsibilities of the person interviewed.

Knowledge and

Understanding of Career Preparation and Development

(6 points)

The paper provides specific information about and several examples of the prerequisite preparation and lifelong career development of the person interviewed that shows an understanding of what is required to be successful in the chosen career.

The paper provides some information and at least one example of the preparation and career development of the person interviewed that shows some understanding of what is required to be successful in the chosen career.

The paper provides limited information and no examples of the preparation and career development of the person interviewed, thus showing a limited understanding of what is required to be successful in the chosen career.

Critical Thinking about and Inquiry into the Career of the Person Interviewed

(6 points)

The paper demonstrates clear evidence of having asked good inquiry questions, analyzed the responses, and made personal application of the information learned.

The paper demonstrates some evidence and analysis of responses to the questions asked; some personal application of the information learned is included.

 

The paper uses a question-response format in reporting on the interview. No analysis of the responses or personal application of the information received is included.

Organization and

Communication

(4 points)

The paper is clearly organized in a logical and sequential manner and communicates effectively through proper language, grammar, and style.

The paper is mostly well-organized and includes minimal language, grammar and style mistakes.

The paper is poorly organized and includes numerous language, grammar, and style mistakes making communication less than effective.

 

-      Written assignment #2 (40 points) (Due on March 9)

Task Description: Each student will revise paper #1 and add a two-to three-page descriptive paper based on information from at least five sources of information of the student's choice (these can be obtained electronically or in print other than newspapers) about the interim positions or steps for advancing in or toward the selected career over a 20-year period of time.

 

 

 

Exemplary Performance

Proficient Performance

Marginal Performance

Clear and Informative Revised Report on the Interview (10 points)

The revised paper (#1) clearly and explicitly articulates the responsibilities of the person interviewed.

The revised paper (#1) generally describes the chosen career but could still be expanded to fully explain the responsibilities of the person interviewed.

Changes made in paper (#1) were editorial, rather than substantive, and the paper fails to clearly describe the responsibilities of the person interviewed.

Description of the Sequential Jobs and Responsibilities in Career Path (4 points)

The paper describes in a comprehensive and detailed manner the jobs and responsibilities of a sequential career path leading to the chosen career.

The paper describes in general and provides some information about the jobs and responsibilities of a sequential career path leading to the chosen career.

The paper fails to describe the prerequisite positions and duties of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

Knowledge and

Understanding about the Sequential Jobs and Responsibilities in Career Path

(10 points)

The paper shows an in-depth and a comprehensive knowledge about and understanding of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The paper shows a general knowledge about and some understanding of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The paper provides limited evidence of research into and knowledge about the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

Critical Thinking and

Inquiry about the Sequential Jobs and Responsibilities in Career Path

(10 points)

The paper demonstrates critical thinking and detailed analysis about the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The paper demonstrates some critical thinking and analysis about the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The paper shows only a superficial inquiry into and analysis of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

Organization and

Communication

(6 points)

The paper effectively communicates the results of critical thinking and analysis in an organized and imaginative way with few, if any, language, grammar, and style errors.

The paper provides good information and is generally organized and effectively presented; contains some language, grammar and style mistakes.

The paper is difficult to follow, fails to effectively inform and capture the interest of the reader, and includes numerous language, grammar, and style mistakes making communication less than effective.

-      Written assignment #3 (60 points) (Due on April 1)

Task Description: Each student will revise and resubmit paper #2, minus paper #1, along with a three- to four page research paper that describes in detail the roles and responsibilities of individuals in the position you eventually would like to have. This research paper must be based on reading a minimum of three articles from scholarly journals (not from a newspapers or popular magazines) or a book about this career.

 

Exemplary Performance

Proficient Performance

Marginal Performance

Clear and Informative Report on the Sequential Jobs and Responsibilities in the Career Path (10 points)

The revised paper (#2) clearly communicates evidence of critical thinking, detailed analysis, and an understanding of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The revised paper (#2) communicates some evidence of critical thinking, analysis, and understanding of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

The revised paper (#2) fails to clearly demonstrate an understanding and analysis of the sequential jobs and responsibilities of individuals seeking to advance in the chosen career.

Description of Chosen Professional Position (8 points)

The paper describes in a comprehensive and detailed manner the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

The paper provides a general description of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

The paper shows a lack of perspective about the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

Knowledge and

Understanding about Chosen Professional Position

(16 points)

The paper shows an in-depth and comprehensive knowledge about and understanding of the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

The paper shows a general knowledge about and some understanding of the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

 

The paper provides limited evidence of research into and knowledge about the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

Critical Thinking and

Inquiry about Chosen Professional Position

(16 points)

The paper demonstrates critical thinking and detailed analysis into the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

The paper demonstrates some critical thinking and analysis into the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

The paper shows only a superficial inquiry into and analysis into the scope and significance of the responsibilities of a professional in the chosen position.

Organization and

Communication

(10 points)

The paper effectively communicates the results of critical thinking and analysis in an organized and imaginative way with few, if any, language, grammar, and style errors.

The paper provides good information and overall organization and more effectiveness in presentation but with some language, grammar, and style mistakes.

 

The paper is difficult to follow, includes numerous language, grammar, and style mistakes, and fails to communicate effectively.

 

-      Written assignment #4 (80 points) (Due on May 4)

Task Description: Each student will revise and combine papers #2 and #3 (excluding paper #1) and add a four-to five-page reflective paper that makes personal application of what you have learned and how your thinking about and conceptualization of what it takes to be successful in the chosen professional position have expanded.

 

 

 

 

Exemplary Performance

Proficient Performance

Marginal Performance

Clear and Informative Combined Report on Steps toward and Preparation for the Chosen Position (20 points)

The combined papers (#2 and #3) clearly communicate evidence of critical thinking, detailed analysis, and an understanding of the chosen position and the sequential jobs and responsibilities needed to advance into the chosen position.

The combined papers (#2 and #3) communicate general evidence of critical thinking, analysis, and understanding of the chosen position and the sequential jobs and responsibilities needed to advance into the chosen position.

The combined papers (#2 and #3) fail to show evidence of critical thinking, analysis, and understanding of the chosen position and the sequential jobs and responsibilities needed to advance into the chosen position.

Reflection Showing Knowledge and

Understanding

(16 points)

The paper shows an in-depth and comprehensive reflection about what has been learned about and what it takes to prepare to enter the chosen position.

The paper shows some reflection about what has been learned about and some understanding about what it takes to prepare to enter the chosen position.

The paper provides limited evidence of what has been learned about and what it takes to prepare for and enter the chosen position.

Reflection Showing Critical Thinking and

Inquiry

(16 points)

The paper demonstrates reflective critical thinking and analysis of what has been learned about what has been learned about and what it takes to prepare to enter the chosen position.

The paper demonstrates some reflective critical thinking and analysis of what has been learned and what it takes to prepare to enter the chosen position.

The paper shows a superficial inquiry into and analysis of learning and what it takes to prepare to enter the chosen position.

Reflection on Personal Application of What Has Been Learned (20 points)

The paper describes definite and extensive personal applications of what has been learned and how these specifically could shape career decisions and actions.

The paper makes some personal applications of what has been learned and how this knowledge potentially could shape career decisions and actions.

The paper fails to make specific personal applications of what has been learned.

Organization and

Communication

(8 points)

The paper effectively communicates the results of critical thinking and analysis in an organized and imaginative manner with few, if any, language, grammar, and style errors.

The paper provides good information and in general is organized with an effective presentation but with some language, grammar and style mistakes.

The paper is difficult to follow and includes numerous language, grammar, and style mistakes resulting in less than effective communication.

 

4.     Group project — Self-select into groups of three or four. There can be no groups of two or none of five or larger. If you do not join and work with a group, you will receive an F in this course. Meet as a group and select one of the projects listed below:

-      Option 1 — Sport Ethics: Conduct an ethical analysis of the conduct of players, coaches, and fans at any two youth, high school, and intercollegiate competitions in any sport of your choice. During each of the competitions identify a minimum of five ethical and/or unethical actions on the part of players, coaches, and/or fans. Following each competition, interview one individual other than a member of your group to determine whether this person agrees or disagrees with your categorization of the actions identified as ethical or unethical. Using any two ethical theories, such as consequential or non-consequential, as a framework, analyze the actions you selected on the part of these groups.

-      Option 2 — Personnel Management: Interview two individuals (not at the same institution or with the same organization) who hold different types of management positions in college athletics (other than at KU), professional sports, or fitness, health or sport clubs. Describe and compare the scope of their responsibilities relative to personnel management, such as hiring, supervision, and evaluation. Describe the key issues associated with all aspects of managing personnel for these two individuals and their organizations.

-      Option 3 — Financial Management: Meet with athletic directors at two high schools or two colleges (other than at KU) to obtain and discuss each institution's athletic program budget. In your analysis, describe the similarities and differences of their budgets. Provide copies of the overall budgets along with the specific budgets for at least three teams per institution and discuss why each budgetary item is included at the budgeted amount.

-      Option 4 —Risk Management: Conduct a safety and risk management analysis of a sport facility or venue (other than at KU) in comparison to national and/or industry standards. In this analysis, describe specific evidence of effective risk management and at least three examples of problems or safety issues. For the safety issues, describe how you recommend addressing these problems.

-      Option 5 — Sport Facility Management: Meet with the sport facility manager for a college athletic program (other than at KU) or professional sport team. Based on what you learned, develop a comprehensive plan for all aspects of managing this facility. Be sure to describe in your report the personnel, anticipated revenues and expenses, and risk management activities along with other important aspects of sport facility management the person interviewed recommended.

-      Option 6 — Sporting Event Management: Meet with the sporting event manager for a college athletic program (other than at KU) or professional sport team. Based on what you learned, develop a comprehensive plan for all aspects of managing a specific sporting event. Be sure to describe personnel, anticipated revenues and expenses, and risk management activities along with other aspects of sporting event management the person interviewed recommended.

-      Option 7 — Marketing Plan: Meet with the head coach (other than in football or basketball) of a high school team or the manager of a fitness, health, or sport club (other than at KU) to learn specific information about the team or organization. Develop a marketing plan for this sport or organization. In this plan, provide specific strategies for increasing attendance (for a team) or memberships (for a club) and how these should be implemented. Be sure to describe the anticipated outcomes or goals to be achieved through the implementation of this marketing plan.

-      Option 8 — A group can choose to design a project other than options 1-7 associated with some aspect of sport management. The group must develop a one-page prospectus that describes exactly what is planned, the scope of the planned work, and the anticipated outcomes of the project. Members of the group must discuss this project in general with the professor to receive prior approval to proceed with the planning.

Each group must submit (electronically via email) by February 4 the members of the group, the option chosen, and a bibliography with a minimum of five resources to be used for this group project. Assigned readings can be used in the group project but cannot be included in this minimum of five resources to be used. Use these formats for citations. for a Book: Author. (date). Title. City, State: Publisher; for a journal article: Author. (date). Title. Journal, Vol., page numbers; for an online citation other than an article in an electronic journal: provide the URL. There are examples on Blackboard of past group projects. One paper copy of the group project (which counts 100 points) must be submitted (typed and double-spaced) and not included in a binder during class on April 29. Each person is expected to contribute approximately the same to the completion of the group project so he or she can receive the same grade as long as there is not a significant disparity in the contributions of each group member. If there is a problem within a group relative to lack of participation or other issues, please bring this to the attention of the professor immediately. If a group member does not contribute his or her share, the professor reserves the right to lower this student's grade. In addition to the group project, each member of the group is required to submit a paper copy of the Group Participation Evaluation Form on April 29 (available on Blackboard). On this form, each group member is asked to assess the contributions of other group members and type a reflection statement of approximately 200 words describing the specific things learned while completing the group project. The scoring rubric for the group project is as follows:

 

90 – 100 points

-             Group members, option selected, and bibliography with a minimum of five resources to be used submitted by February 4

-             Final group project includes all of the specified components and meets the requirements for the chosen project as listed in syllabus (or in the approved group-designed project)

-             Each group member submits the Group Participation Evaluation Form by April 29

-             Analysis is thorough and insightful showing a clear understanding of content

-             Is written in a clear and understandable manner appropriate for college-level writing with few or no grammatical or spelling errors

80 - 89 points

-             Group members, option selected, and partial bibliography submitted by February 4

-             Final group project includes most but not all of the requirements for the chosen project as listed in syllabus (or in the approved group-designed project)

-             Each group member submits the Group Participation Evaluation Form by April 29

-             Analysis provides a general description showing a broad understanding

-             In places the writing lacks clarity in the presentation of the information and contains several grammatical and spelling errors

70 – 79 points

-             Group members, option selected, and bibliography with less than five resources submitted after February 4

-             Final group project includes a brief overview with limited explanation of the importance of what is presented

-             One or more members of the group submits the Group Participation Evaluation Form after April 29

-             Analysis of information is difficult to follow and lacks clarity and contains numerous grammatical or spelling errors

0 - 69 points

-             Group failed to inform professor of group members and option selected and no bibliography was submitted to the professor

-             Final group project includes limited information indicating minimal understanding

-             Members of the group fail to submit the Group Participation Evaluation Form by April 29

-             Provides mostly copies of information collected with limited analysis

-             The extensive grammatical or spelling errors show a failure to edit the report

 

 

5.     Examinations — Each of the three examinations will count 100 points each. The final examination will be comprehensive. Examinations may have both objective and subjective questions; the format for each exam will be announced in advance.

 

Grading: The grading scale is based on a total of 600 points (grades are not curved):

A = 558-600 points

B+ = 522-539 points

C+ = 462-479 points

D+ = 402-419 points

A- = 540-557 points

B = 498-521 points

C = 438-461 points

D = 378-401 points

 

B- = 480-497 points

C- = 420-437 points

F = below 378 points

 

Additional Information

1.     Please place your name tent on your desk each class so the professor can more easily learn your name.

2.     Please remove (not just turn backwards) caps during class.

3.     Cell phones and pagers must be turned off during class. No instant messaging is permitted during class. If you are using or even holding your cell phone during class, it will be taken from you (and returned after class). Computers are permitted as long as they are used to facilitate your learning.

4.     Please do not sit in the same seat during each class. Please do not sit beside the same classmates on a regular basis. In many classes, you will be asked to work with other students, so sitting in various seats will automatically change those with whom you work.

5.     This class will be organized to combine lectures using PowerPoint slides as an outline, class discussions, small group work during class, written assignments, and a group project.

6.     Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty, with academic integrity a requirement of this class. All student work must be completed individually, unless specified otherwise. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses or purchases papers or reports written by someone else, including downloading from the Internet. It also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained from another person without giving credit to that person. Any time you quote from another person, you must give credit to this person by providing a complete citation for the source from which you quoted. If plagiarism or another act of academic dishonesty occurs, such as cheating on an examination, you will receive an F in this course.

7.     If you have an identified disability, please talk with the professor privately about any needed accommodations.

 

Course Outline

Date

Topics

Assigned Readings

Due Dates for Assignments

January 14

Course overview

 

 

January 19

Reading and writing for understanding

-      Staudohar, P. D. (2006). So you want to be a sports agent. Labor Law Journal, 57(4), 246-256.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=23779208&site=ehost-live

 

January 21

Leadership theories; Leadership model of values, people, and teamwork

-      Buhler, P. M. (1988). What kind of leader are you, anyway? SuperVision, 49(10), 3-5. http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=821352&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

 

 

-      Spears, L. C. (2004). Practicing servant-leadership. Leader to Leader, 34, 7-11.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ltl.94

 

January 26

Leadership styles; Four frames of organizations

-      Goleman, D. (2000). Leadership that gets results. Harvard Business Review, 78(2), 78-90.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=2839618&site=ehost-live

-      Bolman, L. G., & Deal, T. E. (1991). Leadership and management effectiveness: A multi-frame, multi-sector analysis. Human Resource Management, 30(4), 509-534.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=9&did=389583701&SrchMode=3&sid=1&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1263575994&clientId=42567&aid=2

Leadership quiz

January 28

Management functions and styles; Competencies of sport managers

-      Katz, N. (2001). Sports teams as a model for workplace teams: Lessons and liabilities. The Academy of Management Executive, 15(3), 56-67.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=83080012&sid=3&Fmt=4&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

-      Whisenant, W. A., & Pedersen, P. M. (2004). The influence of managerial activities on the success of intercollegiate athletic directors. American Business Review, 22(1), 21-26.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=528826661&sid=4&Fmt=4&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Management quiz

February 2

Sport ethics principles

-      Lumpkin, A. (2008). Teaching values through youth and adolescent sports. Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, 21(4), 19-23.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://find.galegroup.com/gtx/infomark.do?contentSet=IAC-Documents&docType=IAC&type=retrieve&tabID=T002&prodId=AONE&docId=A176979350&userGroupName=ksstate_ukans&version=1.0&searchType=PublicationSearchForm&source=gale&infoPage=infoMarkPage

 

February 4

Moral reasoning in sport

-      Dixon, N. (2007). Trash talking, respect for opponents and good competition. Sport Ethics and Philosophy, 1(1), 96-106. http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=24411009&site=ehost-live

Group project plan due

February 9

Application of ethical decision making in sport management

-      Sauser, W. I., Jr. (2005). Ethics in business: Answering the call. Journal of Business Ethics, 58(4), 345-357.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/25123527

Sport ethics quiz

February 11

Principles of human resource management

-      Quirke, B. (2005). Building an internal communication network. Strategic Communication Management, 9(4), 14-17.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=925427951&sid=5&Fmt=4&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

February 16

Motivation theories

-      Ulrich, D. O., & Parkhouse, B. L. (1979). The application of motivation theory in management to the sport arena. Quest, 31(2), 302-311.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=19826742&site=ehost-live

Paper #1 due

February 18

Developing human resources

-      Wolfe, R., Wright, P. W., & Smart, D. L. (2006). Radical HRM innovation and competitive advantage: The Moneyball story. Human Resource Management, 45(1), 111-126.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/112466261/PDFSTART

Personnel management quiz

February 23

Time management; Stress management

-      Stanley, T. L. (2004). The most valuable commodity in the world. The American Salesman, 49(4), 13-18.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=590814921&sid=6&Fmt=2&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

February 25

Examination #1

-       

 

March 2

Accounting fundamentals

-      Swangard, P. (2008). Executive interview: An interview with Heidi Ueberroth. International Journal of Sport Finance, 3(4), 185-188.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=35949201&site=ehost-live

 

March 4

Financial management principles

-      Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics (2009). College sports 101: A primer on money, athletics, and higher education in the 21st century. Available at http://www.knightcommission.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=344&Itemid=84 , pp. 1-25.

 

March 9

Economic principles

-      Platt, A., Tesone, D. V., & Alexakis, G. (2008). Contrasting the industry structure of professional sports franchises and large technology firms: The role of monopolies and other non-competitive models. The Journal of Applied Business and Economics, 8(3), 88-94.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1567880081&sid=7&Fmt=3&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

March 11

Applications of economics to professional sports

-      Siegfried, J., & Zimbalist, A. (2000). The economics of sports facilities and their communities. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(3), 95-114.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=59695335&sid=8&Fmt=2&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Paper #2 due Financial management and economics quiz

March 23

Sport law principles

-      Grady, J. (2009). Smack apparel revisited on appeal: Significant victory or narrow extension of trademark protection for universities' color schemes? Sport Marketing Quarterly, 18(1), 54-56.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1667642731&sid=9&Fmt=2&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

March 25

Sport law principles

-      Rogers, C. P., III. (2008). The quest for number one in college football: The revised bowl championship series, antitrust, and the winner take all syndrome. Marquette Sports Law Review, 18(2), 285-308. (most of these pages are footnotes)

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=32773149&site=ehost-live

 

March 30

Title IX and athletics

-                        Title IX. In Lumpkin, A. (2009). Modern sports ethics: A reference handbook, pp. 48-50; 172-173; 177; 180-189. (on Blackboard)

 

April 1

Risk management

-      Misinec, M. (2005). When the game ends, the pandemonium begins: University liability for field-rushing injuries. Sports Lawyers Journal, 12(1), 181-219. (read only the first 15 pages since the remaining pages are endnotes)

-      http://heinonline.org/HOL/Page?handle=hein.journals/sportlj12&id=1&size=2&collection=journals&index=journals/sportlj

Paper #3 due quiz

April 6

Facility planning and management

-      Sawyer, T. H. (2006). Financing facilities 101. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 77(4), 23-28.

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Sport law and risk management quiz

April 8

Event planning and management

-      Odendahl, M. (2004). Equipping a sporting event. Business First, 20(49), 13.

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-      Wolf, R. (2005). Quarterbacking the Super Bowl. Security Management, 49(9), 102-109.

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Facility and event planning and management quiz

April 13

Strategic planning

-      Kansas athletics five-year strategic plan, 2006-2011 — Unparalleled excellence. Available at: http://kuathletics.cstv.com/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/kan/genrel/auto_pdf/06-strategic-plan

 

April 15

Examination #2

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April 20

Marketing principles

-      Lee, J. W., Miloch, K. S., Kraft, P., & Tatum, L. (2008). Building the brand: A case study of Troy University. Sport Marketing Quarterly, 17(3), 178-182.

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April 22

Market research and applications

-      Dick, R., & Sack, A. L. (2003). NBA marketing directors' perceptions of effective marketing techniques: A longitudinal perspective. International Sports Journal, 7(1), 88-99.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?url=http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=277680651&sid=14&Fmt=2&clientId=42567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

April 27

Advertising; Sponsorships

-      Ross, S. (2006). A conceptual framework for understanding spectator-based brand equity. Journal of Sport Management, 20(1), 22-38.

-      http://www2.lib.ku.edu:2048/login?URL=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=19298981&site=ehost-live

 

April 29

Marketing and promotions in college athletics

-      Dees, W., Bennett, G., & Villegas, J. (2008). Measuring the effectiveness of sponsorship of an elite intercollegiate football program. Sport Marketing Quarterly, 17(2), 79-89.

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Group project due

May 4

Marketing and promotions in professional sports and international sports

-      Fortunato, J. A. (2006). Scheduling promotional events in Major League Baseball: Examining team and sponsor desires. International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, 7(2), 104-114.

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-      Burton, R. (2003). Olympic Games host city marketing: An exploration of expectations and outcomes. Sport Marketing Quarterly, 12(1), 37-47.

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Paper #4 due

May 6

Public relations and media relations

-      Bovinet, J. W., & Bovinet, J. A. (2004). Customer communication in professional sport (NLB, NFL, NHL, NBA): Looking for improvement five years later. Allied Academies International Conference. Academy Studies. Proceedings, 9(1), 9-19.

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Marketing quiz

May 10

Final Examination 10:30 am -1:00 pm